German Shepherds                                                                 German Shepherd Puppies


Distinctly West German, Uniquely American

 Breeding to a higher standard.  Herding, Performance and Service Dogs.  We train/work/title our dogs as well as health test.
 View Our References     Puppies for Sale  |  Older Puppies for Sale  |   Adult/Young Males for Sale  |  Adult/Young Females for Sale
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Leave a message:  214-755-5755  (Phone messages are picked up once a day when possible)  

Last updated - Monday, September 29, 2014 08:59:37 AM -0400

Last updated - Sunday, November 09, 2014 08:04:49 PM -0500

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COURAGE - CHARACTER - PREDICTABILITY
Show puppies by structure; loyal Companions and Protection by nature; Health and Longevity by good genetics. Brought to you by a thoughtful knowledgeable trusted breeder of over 44 years. Breeders of the finest quality Schutzhund/IPO titled & Breed Surveyed German Shepherds in the United States for over 44 years. Our breeding program maintains the integrity of the German Shepherd's heritage to preserve the human-canine bond. 
  "BREEDING CORRECT DOGS BY DESIGN"


Our Merkel Geneology is from
Haίloch, Germany





We are published in these books

   BREEDER QUALIFICATIONS:
   KENNEL NAME:
Haus Merkel
   Breeder Name: Dyan Merkel
   Website:
http://www.hausmerkel.com
   Location: North Texas
   Contact Info:  vhmerkel@yahoo.com
   214-755-5755

   HEALTH TESTS:
   Hip/Elbow Certifications: Yes
   Degenerative Myopathy Certifications: Yes
   Thyroid tests: Yes
   CERF tests: No

   TRAINING:
   Titles/certifies breeding stock in discipline?: Yes

   BREEDING STOCK:
   Raises breeding stock from puppies: Yes
   Titles dogs bred on premise:  Yes
   Imports titled breeding stock: Yes
   Buys from other Breeders:  NO MORE!

   SCHUTZHUND/IPO:
   Has trained in Schutzhund: Yes
   HOT from puppy to SchH3: Yes
   HOT and bred to SchH3: Yes

   CONFORMATION/BREED SURVEY:
   Show ratings: Yes
   Breed survey: Yes

   BREEDER ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
   V Putz vom Haus Merkel SchH3, Kkl 1a
   V Ulla vom Haus Merkel SchH3, Kkl 1a
   V Zessa vom Haus Merkel SchH2, IPO3, Kkl1a
   V Riesa vom Haus Merkel SchH2, Kkl 1a
   V Puma vom Haus Merkel SchH2, Kkl 1a
   V Emma vom Haus Merkel SchH1, Kkl 1a
   SG Wickie vom Haus Merkel IPO1 a
   SG Vessa vom Haus Merkel IPO1 a
   SG1 Clar vom Haus Merkel SchH1 a
   Ch Merkel's Opium SchH1
   V Merkel's Arletta SchH1, a
   SG, VP2 Nixe vom Haus Merkel BH, AD, a
   SG Feli vom Haus Merkel BH, AD, a
   Ch Merkel's Leica UDT, OFA
   Merkel's Leibchen Shiloh UDT, OFA
   Ch Merkels Sangria UDT, OFA
   United States Grand Victrix
   Ch Merkels Vendetta  ROM, OFA
   Ch Merkel' Quaestor CD, ROM, OFA
   Ch Merkel's Essence UD, OFA
   Merkel's Coda vom Jennerick CDX, OFA
   National Certified Search & Rescue
   Lieb vom Haus Merkel OFA,
   National Obedience Winner
  
Ch Merkel's Cut Up of Timmee UDT, OFA
   Certified United States Service Dog
   Bryn vom Haus   Merkel CGC, OFA
   Certified United States Service Dog
  
Fred vom Haus Merkel
   Ch Merkel's The Cutting Edge OFA
   Ch Merkel's Virtual Reality OFA
   Ch Merkel's Tequila CD, OFA
   Ch Merkel's Sante Fe OFA
   Merkel's Spellbound ROM,
OFA
   Merkel's Emma ROM , OFA

   Merkel's Estes CD, near ROM
   2009 Annual Achievement Award Recipient
   Ch Merkel's Heart's are Wild
CDTDTC HIC CGC TDI OFA
   Ch Merkel's Heart to Heart CD, OFA
   PRODOMINANT LINES USED:
   World Sieger Larus von Batu SchH3 Kkl 1a
   World Sieger Zamp vom Thermodos SchH3, Kkl 1
   World Sieger Yasko vom Farbenspiel SchH3,Kkl 1a
   VA Dux della Valcuvia SchH3, Kkl1a
    Kirschental

   WRITTEN GUARANTEE:  Yes
   EDUCATION AVAILABLE:  Yes
   LIFETIME SUPPORT Yes
   YEARS AS BREEDER: 
45
 

S I T E    N A V I G A T I O N

About Us •

Our German Shepherd Males •

Our German Shepherd Females •

RESCUES•
Compare with other Breeders •
Our References
German Shepherd Puppies for Sale •
Older Puppies for Sale
•
Neutering your puppy •
Deposit •
Pricing, Contract •
Adult &Young  Males for Sale •
Adult &Young Females for Sale •


Our German Shepherd Stud Dogs •
Breeding Requirements for Stud •

Puppy Mill Article •
German Shepherd Rescues •
Memorials •
Articles •
OFA  •
Classifieds •
 
More Links:
 
Dog Food Analysis •
Worming & Vaccination Schedule •

OUR OTHER PETS•

Excellent Link to pet/health videos •
Any health care links located here are NOT to replace a veterinarian visit; please take your dog to a vet immediately at any sign of odd behavior or any symptoms of illness or injury. Call your vet and describe your dog's symptoms with any of your concerns about the dog's well-being. Your veterinarian may discover changes in your dog's health that you have overlooked. It is always better to err on the side of caution

HEALTH ARTICLES:
 
 
von Willebrand Disease •
Coprophagia •
Hip dysplasia Positioning •
(A badly positioned x-ray can make
your dog look dysplasic!)
Triple Pelvic Osteotomy •
MORE ARTICLES:
Other Links •
Links •
Contact •
Add your Link
 
Members of           
GSDCA

WDA

Schutzhund USA

 

My beloved mother
(Dorothy Conner Merkel Obituary)
Love, kindness & laughter was her gift to all.  Always on my mind forever in my heart!


LINK: 90 Percent of Pet Foods May Cause Disease in Your Pet

THIS IS WHAT WE FEED

Click photo to go to their site

Large & Giant Breed Puppy

This formula is designed for those puppies that will reach 50 pounds or more as an adult. Its triple meat protein source builds good solid muscle, providing optimum calcium and phosphorus. In addition, there are slightly fewer calories so that puppies don’t gain too much weight before their bodies are ready to support it.

HOW TO GREET A DOG

Click on photo for the
BEST INFORMATION YOU CAN EVER HAVE ON MEETING OTHER PEOPLES DOGS-Children really need to learn this.
 


READING A DOGS BODY LANGUAGE
attribution (C) DFDK9
www.dfdk9.com 

Canine body language
http://dfdk9.wordpress.com/

THIS is why you do not walk your dogs on asphalt or concrete in the summer. If you see someone walking their dogs on asphalt or concrete, PLEASE educated them and get the pet to cooler ground. Original post was from Pet Ambulance Victoria

This should be sent to all the veterinarians including the specialists!



DOG PARK ALERT

We have received two notices. (1) Nails wrapped in cheese at dog parks in Chicago and Massachusetts (see pic). (2) from some friends that in Augusta Maine dog park, antifreeze is being found in doggie water bowls. Please beware and be careful and PLEASE SHARE and spread the word



Ever wonder where puppy mill dogs come from? Here's an example. Many get cooked alive in the sun and freeze to death in the winter. If you purchase your dog from a pet store, I can guarantee your "AKC" certified dog came from a place like this.  This one is even better than the ones  I saw in Iowa and Missouri!



Do you recognize she is a Yorkie?
Please do not purchase your pet from a Pet shop, Backyard breeder or Commercial Puppy Mill.


ALL PETS RESCUES
needs your help!

 

Official PayPal Seal

 

"The man who rears a dog must complete what the breeder began..." Max v. Stephanitz; Father of the German Shepherd Dog

 

 
"Fun at the Beach"

"Fun at Work"


This is a real combination of symptoms that spells out EMERGENCY. These are the classic symptoms of a condition referred to as "bloat" - a dog that is pacing, restless and has unproductive attempts to vomit.

This is a common problem in large breed deep-chested dogs but can also occur in smaller dogs.

Basically what happens is this - the stomach twists causing the blood supply to the stomach to be compromised then leads to tissue death. As tissues are damaged, toxins are released and a sequence of events occurs that if left untreated, leads to death.

If you ever notice these symptoms in your dog, call your local veterinarian or emergency clinic as soon as possible.

This is a condition that is fairly common and often occurs in the evening or nighttime hours. It is also a very expensive condition to treat.  READ MORE...

           

Dealing with Excessive Barking

The first step to stopping barking is to understand why it is happening. Dogs bark for all kinds of reasons, including anxiety, boredom and/or loneliness. Sometimes they bark just because it feels good.  Luckily, most dogs will respond to one or other intervention to curtail their barking. Whether you simply bring an outdoor dog inside or take the time to apply behavior-modification techniques, you can cause a dog to be less of a nuisance and to be more socially acceptable.


Removing Skunk Odor

No need for the tomato juice. Use a mixture of 10 parts hydrogen peroxide to 1 part baking soda. Add a dash of degreasing dishwashing soap and pour into a spray bottle. Spray liberally over dry coat and allow to air dry. Avoid eyes. Works on other objects, too!



Click link below to enjoy the Birding Site
FOR THOSE WHO LIKE BIRDING

FDA DOG FOOD RECALLS    

 

 

 

TRAINING YOUR GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPY
Great quote from old time dog trainer:
"If you want to know what's wrong with your dog, go look in the mirror. "
TRAINING TIP: Let’s talk about positive training and why it is so effective. Positive training means rewarding your dog for a desirable behavior. When your dog exhibits a behavior you like, you show your dog that you like that behavior by rewarding your dog. A reward is anything your dog enjoys such as food, throwing a ball, a game of tug, or praise. Rewarding your dog will encourage your... dog to repeat that behavior again. By repeating the behavior, your dog will get good at practicing it until the behavior becomes learned. Correction based training in my opinion isn’t training at all. It is not based on intelligence or compassion. Jerking a dog's neck or shocking a dog into "submission" will only serve to cause a dog to become fearful. Pain and discomfort decrease your dog's ability both to learn and to play. Positive training sets your dog up for success by teaching him what you would like him to do so there is no need to punish or to get angry with him. Through positive reinforcement you will teach your dog how to behave in new environments and perform behaviors you want. It’s truly amazing to see how positive reinforcement strengthens the bond between you and your dog, builds his confidence and teaches him to trust.  www/PatriotPaw.org

  • Start your training the moment your puppy comes home.
     

  • Always give your dog a treat when you call him to you.
     

  • Train before meals or when your dog is relaxed and hungry
     

  • Your German Shepherd puppy was bred for extreme trainability so limit your training to under 5 minutes (short and sweet).
     

  • A daily routine builds good learning habits.
     

  • Always end on a high note, when the puppy has done what you asked right, lots of praise.
     

  • Do not over train.  Your puppy will lose interest and not retain what it did learn.  And he may go into avoidance.  If he goes into avoidance, stop all training for a week or so until he solicits you to play.
     

  • Praise, Praise, Praise.
     

  • Training up until a year of age is all motivational.  We start with food.  Vienna hot dogs cut in little pieces.   There are lots of training treats available at Pet Markets too.  Just make sure that whatever you do get it must be in tiny pieces for the training or your dog will be so busy eating the biscuit that you won't have time for the training.  You want your puppy to quickly eat the treat and immediately after look at you for more.
     

  • Hold your treat up by your face so that the puppy will learn to look you in the eye.  If you don't have your puppies attention your puppy will not learn.
     

  • Always use a quiet area with few distraction or interruptions.
     

  • Only one person at a time should train.  Qualified children should always be supervised by a knowledgeable adult, your dog can be confused easily.
     

  • Consistency counts.  I will spend 2 weeks alone on sit.  Twice a day for a few minutes.  After the puppy is good with the sit, I will turn my back, call the pup and generally the puppy will come around to my front and sit directly in front of me.
     

  • Stay and Down are negative commands and I generally don't work on them until the dog is older.   However you can teach the down easily with food so it is not associated with negative training.
     

  • Heeling can be taught by holding a treat/toy in front of the dogs face as he walks on the left side of you.  The dog will associate you with food/toy and keep his eyes on you instead of everything else that is out there.
     

  • NEVER hit or shout at your dog for not obeying a command.
     

  • Harsh corrections can result in fear and aggression - both are counter productive to learning.
     

  • If your dog misbehaves, he should be reprimanded consistently and immediately.  A firm, verbal rebuke is enough.  Don't rebuke your dog for doing something you didn't see at the moment.

 

TEACHING SIT:

Hold the treat so the dog looks up to get it.  As the dog tips its head up it will they will automatically sit.  Consistency of working this way with the sit will produce the response on command.

TEACHING DOWN:

Command your dog to 'sit', then sit down in front of him.  Hold a small piece of food in front of his nose.  As you command 'down', move the food down to the ground so his nose follows it.  If he need help, put your hand on his shoulders and guide them down.  When he is lying down, praise him and give him the treat.  You can also push the treat between your puppy's front legs, as he tried to follow it his back end will slide into a down position.  Praise him and give him the reward.

TEACHING (HERE) COME:

From the very first day you bring your puppy into the house he should be given a treat every time you call him to you.  After your puppy learns the sit you can combine the 'come' with the 'sit' and then give the treat/reward.  And always lots of praise and excitement when your dog comes to you.    NEVER, NEVER call your dog to you for punishment.  NEVER use his name negatively or during a punishment phase (I would prefer that you take time out for yourself before you even consider a punishment phase for your dog).   If you instill in your dog from day one that it is exciting and rewarding to come to you he will sail through his teenage stage eagerly wanting to please you.   This could also save your dogs life to know that he is 100% on the recall.

I recommend once you have these commands working smoothly with your dog that you join a local obedience club and work on putting all of this together in a routine so you can be a team.  This is usually after the teenage stage  and about 13 -14 months of age.

CRATE TRAINING:

We crate train all puppies from the day that they are weaned.   My advice to you when you start is to put the puppy in the crate and then take the whole family to the movies so you won't have to listen to him throw a temper tantrum.  Your puppy will adjust quickly to his crate.   Do not take the puppy out if he is throwing a fit as it will allow him to manipulate you whenever he wants.  I always try to let the puppy out when he is quiet or asleep.  Once your puppy gets use to being crated you will be able to tell when he has to go to the bathroom...his cry will be much different than that of a temper tantrum.

More on Motivational Training

Housetraining Your New Puppy
by Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff

Housebreaking Rule #1:
If you don't catch your puppy making an "accident," don't punish him for it.
Housebreaking Rule #2:
When he does it right outside, praise him!

Housebreaking your new puppy doesn't have to be hard or messy, nor should it take very long if done right. Getting your dog to do its business outside is a matter of training, and the more attention you can give to your puppy during this crucial training, the shorter this awkward stage will last.

Methods of housebreaking

Starting Inside: There are several ways to housebreak a puppy. With the first, you can put down papers or pretreated pads, encouraging them to use these areas for going to the bathroom. The pads are scented with a chemical that attracts the puppy to use them. Whenever you see them starting into their "pre-potty pattern," such as walking around and sniffing the floor, you gently pick them up without talking and carry them over to the papers/pad and then praise them when they go to the bathroom.
When all goes well and they are using the papers consistently, the papers are either moved closer to the door and/or another set is placed outside. The transition is made from concentrating the toilet habits to one spot inside the home to one spot outside the home. Finally, the papers inside are eliminated. The only problem with this method is that for a period of time it encourages the animal to eliminate inside the home. In our experience, housebreaking may take longer when this method is used.

Crate Training: The second popular method of housebreaking involves the use of a crate or cage. Make sure the crate isn't too large - just big enough to fit their sleeping blanket or mat. Dogs do not like to soil their beds because they would be forced to lay in the mess. It works, and while in these confines, most pups will control their bladder and bowels for a longer time than we would expect. Young puppies, at 8 or 9 weeks of age can often last for 7 or 8 hours, however, we would never recommend leaving them unattended in a crate for that long in most circumstances.
During housebreaking, whenever the puppy is inside the home but cannot be watched, he is placed in the crate. This might be while you are cooking, reading to the children, or even away from the home. The last thing you do before you put the puppy in the crate is take him outside to his favorite spot. The first thing you do when you take the animal out of the crate is another trip outside. No food or water goes in the crate, just a blanket and maybe a chew toy to occupy his time. Overnight is definitely crate time. As your faith in the puppy grows, leave him out for longer and longer periods of time.

Constant Supervision: The last method involves no papers, pads, or crates. Rather, you choose to spend all the time necessary with the puppy. This works very well for people who live and work in their homes, retired persons, or in situations where the owners are always with the animal. Whenever they see the puppy doing his "pre-potty pattern" they hustle him outside. It is important that the dog is watched at all times and that no mistakes are allowed to occur. When he is taken outside, use a leash or lead to keep him less distracted and watch the puppy closely - as soon as all goes as planned, he should be praised enthusiastically. Do not play until after the pup goes so he learns to go quickly on command. Use Simple and Consistent Verbal cues

Specific verbal communications will also help the two of you understand what is desired. It is an excellent idea to always use a word when it is time to head to the bathroom. We like "Outside?" Remember that whenever you use a verbal command or signal, it is important that everybody in the family always uses the same word in the same way.

Once outside, we try to encourage the pup to get on with the act in question. We use the phrase "Do your numbers." Others use 'Do It,' 'Potty,' or 'Hurry Up.' As soon as your pup eliminates, it is very important to praise them with a "Good Dog" and then come back inside immediately. Again, make this trip that started outside with a specific word "Outside" be for a purpose. If we are taking the pup out to play with a ball or go for a walk we will not use this word even if we know they will eliminate while we are outside.

If Accidents Happen

One of the key issues in housebreaking is to follow Rule Number One: If you do not catch your puppy doing it, then do not punish him for it! We do not care what someone else may tell you or what you read, if you find a mess that was left when you were not there, clean it up and forget it.

Discipline will not help because unless you catch the puppy in the act, he will have no idea what the scolding is for. At this point in his life a puppy's memory is very, very poor. Your puppy has urinated and defecated hundreds of times before he met you. Nobody made a fuss before and the pup will not relate the punishment, regardless of its form, together with something he has done without incident numerous times before. Especially if he did it more than 30 seconds ago! Puppies are just like our children. Unless something was really fun (and a repetitious act like going to the bathroom is not), they are not thinking about what they did in the past. They are thinking about what they can do in the future.

The same should be said as to your first reaction when you actually catch them in the act of urinating or defecating. Do not get mad. Quickly but calmly pick them up and without raising your voice sternly say "No." Carry them outside or to their papers. They are going to be excited, but stay there with them a while and if they finish the job, reward them with simple praise like "Good Dog."

Remember, though the housebreaking process may get frustrating at times - especially the times cleaning up the occasional accident - be patient and stay calm. If you want housebreaking to go quickly, regardless of the method you use, follow these simple tips and try to spend as much time as possible with your puppy.

 

Collars and harnesses

Choke Collar: The choke collar is a length of metal-link chain with a large circular ring on either end. The chain is slid through one of these rings and it is slid over the dog's head. When the dog displays an undesirable behavior the collar is tightened. This is primarily used in traditional dog training.  These collars should never be left on a dog when he is not in training.

Prong (or Pinch) Collar: The prong collar is made of metal links that fit together by connecting through long teeth that point inward toward the dog’s neck. A section of this collar is made of a loop of chain links that tighten the collar when pulled, pinching the dog's neck.  This collar is mainly used in traditional dog training for hard to handle dogs.  Also used for cleaning up obedience and bitework training to help the dog become more precise.  This collar should not be left on the dog and is recommended for professional use only.

Radio-controlled Collars: These consist of a radio receiver attached to the collar and a transmitter that the trainer holds. When triggered, the collar delivers an aversive. The specific aversives vary with different makes of collars. Some emit sounds, some vibrate, some release citronella or other aerosol sprays, some apply electrical stimulation. A few collars incorporate several of these. Of these, electrical stimulation is the most common and the most widely used.  Modern electrical collars are adjustable, allowing the trainer to match the stimulation level to the dog's sensitivity and temperament. They deliver a consistent and measured level of aversive stimulation, ranging from a tickle, tingle, twitch, or a prickly twinge to a highly aversive electrical event that produces significant discomfort and startle but without risk of producing physical injury or pain.  Although these collars are inappropriate for use as the initial or primary means for establishing basic obedience control, no comparable techniques or tools can currently match the efficacy or safety of them for establishing safe and reliable off-leash control. Not to be used by novice handlers.

Martingale Collar: The martingale collar is a collar that has only a section on it that will tighten when pulled. This is different from the choke collar that will tighten indefinitely.

Head Collar: The head collar is very similar to a halter on a horse. The theory it is that if you have control of the head, you have control of the body. The head collar generally consists of two loops. One loop goes behind the ears and the other goes over the dog's nose and they meet somewhere below the dog's jaw. This tool makes it more difficult for the dog to pull on his leash. This tool is usually employed during positive reinforcement training.

No Pull Harness: The no-pull harness is worn on the body of the animal. The no-pull harness differs significantly from the standard harness since it makes it harder for the dog to pull because it distributes energy over the dog’s back and shoulders. The no-pull harness restricts the movement of the dog’s body when the dog pulls. Like the head collar, the no pull harness does not teach the dog not to pull; it only makes it harder for the dog to pull. This harness is generally used during positive reinforcement training.

 

More training links:
Clicker Training

This site designed and maintained by Dyan Merkel of
DLM DESIGN STUDIO
Copyright ©1998

 
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